April 15, 2011

At one point I had it [The art of Computer programming] as my monitor stand because it was one of the biggest set of books I had, and it was just the right height. That was nice because it was always there, and I guess then I was more prone to use it as a reference because it was just right in front of me.
~ Peter Norvig

You know, it’s not just what the program does—there’s a story. There’s a story about how the program is organized, there’s a story about the context in which the program is expected to operate.
~ Guy Steele

I think it’s not an accident that we often use the imagery of magic to describe programming. We speak of computing wizards and we think of things happening by magic or automagically. And I think that’s because being able to get a machine to do what you want is the closest thing we’ve got in technology to adolescent wish-fulfillment. And if you look at the fairy tales, people want to be able to just think in their minds what they want, wave their hands, and it happens. And of course the fairy tales are full of cautionary tales where you forgot to cover the edge case and then something bad happens.
~ Guy Steele

In the spectrum of implementers, I probably err on the side of just making things happen. A lot of that is because I get so much of a thrill bringing things to life that it doesn’t even matter if it’s wrong at first. The point is, that as soon as it comes to life it starts telling you what it is.
~ Dan Ingalls

You’ve got to have a logical mind. But I spent a lot of time in the country in Virginia while learning about computers. I always thought that if I wanted to start a computer company in the mountains of Virginia, I’d go find the mechanics. Except in certain fairly esoteric parts, the math isn’t near as important as logic and intuition.
~ Dan Ingalls

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