Archive for the 'Art' Category

January 25, 2017

“Bastava il nuovo sogno, bastava la nuova, rinnovata brama per rendere sopportabile l’esistenza, per conferirle qualcosa di simile a un senso, per illuminarla e redimerla. Gli amici di Albert, perlomeno quelli che ancora gli restavano, non comprendevano molto bene queste sue fantasie. Di una cosa pero’ s’avvedevano, ed era che Albert viveva sempre piu’ chiuso in se stesso, che parlava sempre piu’ tra se’ e sorrideva in maniera sempre piu’ strana, che era lontanissimo, non partecipava affatto a cio’ che per altri e’ caro e importante, si asteneva dalla politica e dai traffici, non partecipava a gare di tirassegno e a balli, a dotte conversazioni sull’arte, in una parola a nulla di cio’ che prima gli dava gioia. Era divenuto un eccentrico, un mezzo matto, capace di andarsene a passeggiare in una grigia, fredda giornata d’inverno, respirando gli odori e i colori dell’aria gelida, di star dietro a un bambino capace solo di balbettii, di rimanere per ore a fissare un’acqua verde, un’aiuola fiorita, oppure di sprofondare, come un lettore nel proprio libro, nelle linee che scorgeva in un peszetto fi legno tagliato, in una radice o in un tubero. Nessuno piu’ si interessava a lui, che all’epoca viveva in una cittadina straniera.” ~ Hesse

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January 25, 2017

“E’ davvero necessario che tu faccia quel che fai? Questi tuoi quadri devono assolutamente essere dipinti? Non sarebbe la stessa cosa, per te e per chiunque altro, se te ne andassi semplicemente a passeggiare e a bere vino? Dipingendo fai per te stesso qualcosa di diverso che se ti inebriassi, ti dimenticassi per un po’ di te stesso, ammazzassi semplicemente il tempo?” ~ Hesse

December 28, 2016

“Il poeta si trova a casa sua in ogni selvaggia contrada piu’ che nei templi.” ~ Nietzsche

December 28, 2016

“The thing of course, is to make yourself alive. Most people remain all of their lives in a stupor. The point of being an artist is that you may live. You won’t arrive. It is an endless search.”
~ Sherwood Anderson

Eero Järnefelt

December 26, 2016

kevattalven-aurinko

December 26, 2016

lion

December 26, 2016

December 26, 2016

“In order to excite the mind to various inventions, one should contemplate “walls covered with shapeless stains” or made of ill-assorted stones: one can find in them mountain landscapes, trees, battles, “figures with lively movements”, faces, and “strange costumes”.”
~ “Leonardo. The artist and the man”, Serge Bramly.

December 26, 2016
In Leonardo’s view, “art, science, everything, including literature and philosophy, proceeded exclusively from nature. ‘No one should imitate the manner of another, for he would then deserve to be called a grandson of nature, not her son. Given the abundance of natural forms, it is important to go straight to nature rather than to the masters who have learned from her’.”
“In his view, all branches of knowledge were connected and interdependent, and man was always at the center. “Man is the model of the world”, as he put it. […] He discussed botany with the vocabulary of an embryologist or gynecologist, while he tackled anatomy in the spirit of a geographer. […] Everything is in everything, he seems to be saying. […] He was passionately pursuing his interests in twenty or more subjects.”
The ‘fantasie dei vinci’ in the Sala delle Asse are “symbols of both the infinity and the unity of the world, they proclaim that there must be a rule governing everything.” … Everything was connected, like the long echoes in Baudelaire’s poem, “in a deep and dark unity”.
“From 1490 on, Leonardo sought to assimilate and rigorously classify (according to what he called “my mathematical principles”) the whole of human knowledge, by structuring it, correcting it if necessary, and enlarging it if possible.”

~ “Leonardo. The artist and the man”, Serge Bramly.

December 26, 2016

[…] “compared by Baudelaire to a “deep and dark mirror”, Leonardo seduces us by his hermeticism, his strangeness.”

“This Leda no more appeals to the delirium of the senses than the Mona Lisa does; it speaks of the obscure mechanism of childbirth, of genetic aberration, of the imperious and primitive surge of life in the depths of the body and the entrails of the earth. Some critics admit to finding the contents of this work terrifying. Looking at it, one senses only too well the transcendence of science: one feels how the painter, in conceiving his picture, had studied the relentless growth of plants, whirlpools of water, and abdomens dissected by flickering candlelight: One grasps above all the fascination, unease, and irrational anguish aroused by the “hideous” idea of procreation and the “great mystery” of woman. … With its idolatrous and tormented naturalism, the painting outraged not so much virtue as Christian reason.”

“His figures are not smiling the smile of inner peace. They are smiling in order to bewitch. … Leonardo sets out to disturb and trouble the emotions. … His subject has ceased to be “a voice crying in the wilderness”. He has reached the ultimate limits of human knowledge; he smiles and points at the source of everything, which amazes him but which is unfathomable.”

~ “Leonardo. The artist and the man”, Serge Bramly.